Joseph Boucher de la Broquerie

Male 1701 - 1762  (60 years)


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  • Name Joseph Boucher de la Broquerie 
    Born 22 Jul 1701  Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 28 Feb 1762  Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I4930  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 3 Jan 2022 

    Father Pierre Boucher,   b. 18 Aug 1653, Three Rivers, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Aug 1740, Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Charlotte Denys de la Trinite,   b. 30 Aug 1663, Tours, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jun 1740, Chambly, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 25 Oct 1683  Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Family ID F1786  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Charlotte Tailhandier,   b. 11 Sep 1707, Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Nov 1740, Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years) 
    Married 29 Nov 1730  Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Joseph Boucher de la Broquerie,   b. 4 Apr 1732,   d. 1802  (Age 69 years)  [natural]
     2. Ann Charlotte Boucher de la Broquerie,   b. 23 May 1788, Montreal, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1855, Boucherville, Quebec Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
     3. Louise Henriette la Brocquerie  [natural]
    Last Modified 3 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F1785  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • - Joseph Boucher de La Broquerie, 1701-1762, was active in King George's War, which included military operations in North America that formed part of the War of the Austrian Succession, and the French and Indian Wars from 1754-1763.
      Several references to "La Broquerie" during the French and Indian War incorrectly cite Pierre Boucher de La Broquerie. For instance, a map of Lake Ontario was credited to Pierre, when it was drawn by Joseph. And a reference to a ship used in the Battle of Fort Levis at Ogdensburg, L'Outaouaise (The Ottawa) states it was commanded by Pierre, when in fact it was Joseph.
      There were two persons in the family named Pierre about this time period. One, father of Joseph Boucher de La Broquerie, had died by 1740. The other, a brother to Joseph, was born in 1689 but died in 1757. So it must have been Joseph Boucher de La Broquerie.
      With that name, there are two possibilities. Either it was Joseph, son of Pierre, who was born in 1701 and died in 1762, and who would have been 55 while commanding another ship called the Huron and 59 while commanding the L'Outaouaise, or, his son, Joseph Boucher de La Broquerie, 1732-1802, who would have been 24 commanding the Huron and 28 commanding the Outaouaise.
      The issue was settled at a meeting of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Feb. 17, 1897. A member, Henry H. Edes called attention to the fact that the full name and antecedents of Pierre Boucher de La Broquerie, who led the French and Indians in the attack made upon Wells in the summer of 1693, has apparently been hitherto unknown to our American historians. So little appears to have been known of La Broquerie by our American writers that they have obscured his identity under various misspellings of his titular appellation. Mr. Edes than communicated correspondence he had with John G. Bourinot, D.C., secretary of the Royal Society of Canada, re. the Index of the first volume of the Publications of this society: "Dear Mr. Edes: I am not able for a day or two to go fully into the La Brognerie question. I know, however, it is a misprint for La Broquerie, one of the names of the Boucher family."
      A later letter from Mr. Edes noted he had obtained information respecting La Broquerie from Benjamin Sulte, author of "Canadiens Francais" and the best informed man in Canada on such subjects: "Pierre Boucher de Brosbois, governor of Three Rivers, was the father of Pierre Boucher de La Broquerie, born, Three Rivers, 1653, married, Quebec, Oct. 25, 1683 to Charlotte Denys de la Trinite. La Broquerie lived at Boucherville. He is the officer of 1693 mentioned by Mr. Edes. His father, Pierre Boucher de Grosbois and Boucherville, lived from 1668 until 1717 on his Seigniory of Boucherville, and was known by the name of Mr. de Boucherville. After 1717, Pierre Boucher de la Broquerie, being the eldest son, took the name of Boucherville and the Seigniory; he died there Aug. 17, 1740. Joseph, son of the latter, called also La Broquerie, did good services during the wars of 1744-60. In 1756, he built ships on Lake Ontario; we have a map of that Lake by him, 1757. He died at Boucherville (of which he was the Seignor) Feb. 28, 1762. - B. Sulte; May 24, 1896."

      Other information about Joseph:

      - From "An Old Frontier of France." "Little is learned of La Broquerie. In 1756 he commanded the schooner Huron of 18 guns, carrying 40 marines, and the seemingly large crew of 80 men. Aside from his commands of the Huron and the Outaouaise, he does not figure in the records or reports of the time."
      - From "All Canada in the Hands of the British: General Jeffery Amherst." "A civilian sailing master, Rene-Hippolyte La Force had been appointed by Governor de Vaudreuil to be master of the Iroquoise, and served in this capacity throughout at least the 1759 campaign. Another "Canadian gentleman," Joseph Boucher dit La Broquerie, had been appointed master of the Outaouaise. La Broquerie was highly experienced on Lake Ontario, having captained the French schooner Huron during the 1756 campaign, and prepared a chart of the lake in 1757."
      - From the British Museum: copy of map stating that the cartographer is Pierre Boucher de La Broquerie. The map was formerly owned by King George III, and donated to the museum by King George IV. It shows the French fleet which "includes La Huralt (Hurault) of whom Pierre Boucher de la Broquerie was commanding officer - Malcomson, Robert. Warships of the Great Lakes.
      - The Jesuit missionary, Claude Godefroy Cocquart, wrote to his brother: "On the 19th of April 1756 was launched at Fort Frontenac a schooner of 150 tons, 18 pieces of cannon and 30 swivels, to oppose the English Admiral of 24 guns, which was likewise built on Lake Ontario. . . . Our little fleet on Lake Ontario, in number about 5 vessels, having met the English fleet, amounting to 10, gave them battle. We have taken the English Admiral; afterwards put the others to flight, and obliged two to run ashore, with all sails set, near Fort Chouaguen." " Canada has seen," he says of this affair, " for the first time, a naval engagement on these lakes."
      This is a singularly distorted account of what happened, although the engagement, much less impressive than the priest made it appear, was truly enough the first naval conflict between French and English on the lake. As already related, the French vessels, carrying the troops of Beam which had worked on the fortifications of Niagara, had sailed from that fort late in June. On the 27th, they fell in with the English, but the latter, mistrusting their own strength, took to their heels. The best-equipped of the French craft, La Marquise de Vaudreu, La Force, commander, carried eight 8-pounders, eight sixes and eight swivels of two pounds, a crew of 30 men, and 50 marines. A consort schooner. La Huron, commanded by La Broquerie, carried eight 6's, four 4's, and six swivels, a crew, by one account, of 80 men, and 40 marines.

      - In 1759, Louis-Pierre Poulin de Courval Cresse undertook the construction of three corvettes at the shipyard at Point au Baril (at Maitland, in Ontario), on the St. Lawrence River. Two of the ships (l'Outaouaise and l'Iroquoise) were launched and put into service on the river and on Lake Ontario. In 1760, the French built Fort Levis on Chimney Island to oppose British forces commanded by Amherst who were advancing up the St. Lawrence to capture Montreal. The fort was commanded by Capt. Pierre Pouchot, who also had command of two brigs/corvettes, one named l'Outaouaise, crewed by 100 sailors and commanded by Joseph Boucher de la Brocquerie. It carried 10, 12-pounders, one 18-pounder and swivel guns. On Aug. 7, 1760, Amherst's forced arrived and the battle began. At dawn of 17 August, Williamson set out in a gig, accompanied by five row galleys (one armed with a howitzer, the others each armed with a single 12-pounder). The galleys took shelter fore and aft of l'Outaouaise, where they could not be hit by the ship's broadsides. The British galleys fired grapeshot and round shot at the French ship, crippling l'Outaouaise, which drifted helplessly towards the British battery set up at Pointe au Baril. After three hours of fighting, l'Outaouaise had managed to fire around 72 shots, damaging two of the British galleys. LaBroquerie was forced to surrender l'Outaouaise to Williamson. LaBroquerie was wounded in the fighting. Fifteen members of his crew were killed or wounded.

      The captured l'Outaouaise was repaired and renamed Williamson, to be put back into service by Captain Patrick Sinclair against her former owners. On 19 August, Amherst commenced the attack on Fort Levis. La Force and his crew had been ordered back from the beached l'Iroquoise to the fort to assist with its defense. Williamson was hit 48 times by the five French guns when it joined in with the British batteries firing on Fort Levis from surrounding islands. Mohawk and Onondaga finally arrived at the scene in the evening and Amherst called a ceasefire for the night. The attack resumed at dawn on 20 August with Williamson, Mohawk and Onondaga all firing on the fort with a combined 50 guns. As the attack progressed, the French guns hit and sank Williamson and Onondaga. Mohawk ran aground under the French cannon, where it sat helpless as it was pounded until out of action. The British batteries on the surrounding islands continued to fire, switching to "hot shot", used to start fires within the fort. The siege continued until 24 August when Pouchot ran out of ammunition for his guns and asked for terms.

      - In 1759, Louis-Pierre Poulin de Courval Cresse undertook the construction of three corvettes at the shipyard at Point au Baril (at Maitland, in Ontario), on the St. Lawrence River. Two of the ships (l'Outaouaise and l'Iroquoise) were launched and put into service on the river and on Lake Ontario. In August 1760, they were both captured, with the uncompleted ship at Fort Levis in the neighbourhood of the troops of Jeffery Amherst. Renamed respectively Williamson and Anson, they transported provisions from the head of the rapids of the St. Lawrence River to Oswego and Niagara. They were both damaged during their French service; as British transport vessels, both were lost due to harsh weather conditions and driven ashore.

  • Sources 
    1. [S49] FamilySearch Family Tree, FamilySearch.org, "Family Tree," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : modified 02 February 2018, 12:12), entry for Pierre Boucher Deboucherville(PID https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/4:1:LX3R-6LR); contributed by various users. PersonID LX3R-6LR.
      Pierre Boucher Deboucherville