Earl Calvin Como

Earl Calvin Como

Male 1919 - 1996  (76 years)

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Earl Calvin ComoEarl Calvin Como was born on 8 Dec 1919 in Ogdensburg, NY (son of John Earl Como and Elizabeth Recore); died on 10 Nov 1996 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried on 12 Nov 1996 in Ogdensburg Cemetery, NY.

    Notes:

    - 1925 New York State census: Earl C. Como was 5 years old and living at 106 Riverside Ave. with his parents, John E. and Elizabeth Como.

    - May 29, 1932: The list of the awards made at the St. Lawrence county Boy Scout court of honor held Tuesday night in the courthouse at Canton: Tenderfoot Troop 1- Earl C. Como.

    - March 10, 1934. Journal published a poem by Earl Como:
    The Dying Cowboy

    I'm beyond all human care,
    Stand back sisters, give me air.
    Hear before you while you stand,
    The last words of a passing man.

    I've rode the trails through and through,
    And now I will be leaving you.
    Take me out where I can lie,
    And watch the roundup while I die.

    Tell my son, his dad has gone,
    O'er the divide into the Great Beyond.
    Tell him that I will be gone,
    To the happy hunting ground.

    A gun in hand since I was born,
    A gun that shot me just this morn.
    So silently bow your reverent heads,
    For a passing man, who is passed and dead.

    Earl Como, 14 years old of 8 Jackson St.

    - Republican Journal, March 14, 1934: (Earl Como writes in his autobiography that he wrote a "sarcastic piece about the mayor, Ralph Morisette, which was published in the local paper. But the mayor, thinking my sarcasm was due to the inability of a kid my age to rhyme, actually invited me down to City Hall to congratulate me."

    MAYOR MORISSETTE
    Listen children, and do not fret,
    And I'll tell you the story of Mayor Morissette.
    It was just three years ago that he,
    Brought back to our town prosperity.

    He said to his friends in the city hall.
    "In the belfry go, but that isn't all,
    "If hard times come by land or sea,
    "Just up and ring that bell for me."

    On the opposite street stood Mayor Morissette,
    A dauntless man all ready and set.
    He heard the frogs and the crickets sing,
    When hark! Did that darn bell just ring?

    He started out with a sword in hand,
    And kicked depression from the land.
    He chased hard times through house and street,
    'Till depression fell in the swamp of defeat.

    From every barn and tomato can,
    There comes a cry, "God, what a man!"
    Poems are made by fools like me,
    But who can make a man like he?

    Earl Como, 14, 8 Jackson St

    - Earl Como notes in his autobiography that he was expelled from school in his sophomore year in March, 1935, when he was 15. His report card showed he was expelled in March, 1936, when he was 16. "The difficulty I have in dating these events was the fact that my family told me, and I believed, that I was a year older than I actually was," he wrote. "Therefore, when I was expelled in March of my sophomore year, I was only 15, not 16. I did not know this until some years later. But I can state with certainty that the year was 1935." But it was 1936, not 1935. That same year, he joined the CCCs and writes, "Miss Westbrook suggested that I wait until my birthday in December, then add a year to my age and join the CCCs. Bear in mind that a year had already been added to my age, therefore when I joined the CCCs in December, supposedly at the age of 18, I would in reality be only 16." He later writes that he started for the CCC camp "Dec. 10. 1935." However, it was 1936, not 1935, and he was 17, not 16. The Avance News of Jan. 21, 1937: "Five Ogdensburg boys have been sent to CCC camps in this district, Welfare Commissooner Lawrence J. McCarthy announced yesternay. Allen Lovely, Earl Como and Chester Vinch were sent to the Benson Mines camp and Leo Tynon and Carl Hebert to the Pierrepont camp."

    - Nov. 24, 1930: MISSING $100 BILL CASE IS BEFORE JUDGE. Earl Como Dismissed For Lack of Evidence That Felix Boyer Gave His Son $100 Bill in Change.
    Earl Como, 1518 River street, testified in police court this morning he knew nothing about a $100 bill which Felix Boyer, Lake Street groceryman, claimed was given Como's son by mistake Friday afternoon. Others who testified under oath were Mr. Boyer, Earl Como, Jr., about six years old, and Joseph Dishaw. This case was finally dismissed for lack of evidence. The little Como boy when questioned by Attorney Alford Wells, who represented Mir. Boyer, denied he told the police Saturday night he got a $100 bill in change from the Boyer store. Mr. Boyer testified the Como boy came into the store between two and three o'clock Friday afternoon with a check amounting to about $11. He wanted it cashed for his father. About 15 minutes after the boy left, the $100 billl was discovered missing. Como claimed it was a ten dollar bill his son brought home. Joseph Dishaw was questioned about changing the bill for Como Saturday night said he was crossing the Lafayette street bridge with Mrs. Dishaw and he met Como. He was asked by Como if he could change a $10 bill. Como handed him the $10 bill, Dishaw testified, and he gave him two fives for it. The case was then dismissed by Judge Edward Ewart.

    - June 15, 1933: June 15-Jury was unable to agree in the case of Elizabeth Como as administratrix of the estate of Richard Como against Earl Fleming after a trial yesterday in county court. At 5:30 o'clock the jury reported it was unable to agree and County Judge James C. Doleu sent it back with instructions to try and arrive at a verdict by 6. When that time came, the panel announced it was hopelessly divided.
    Mrs. Como, mother of the 13 year old Ogdensburg boy who was fatally injured while coasting down Ford Avenue at Main Street, Ogdensburg, early the evening of Jan. 3, 1932, was represented by Attorney John Livingston while Attorney Edmund FitzGerald handled the case for the defendant. At the conclusion of the plaintiffs presentation Attorney FitzGerald moved for dismissal of the action on the ground that the plaintiff had failed to make out a case. Motion was denied whereupon Mr. FitzGerald declined to offer an evidence and let the case go to the jury.
    Witnesses for the plaintiff were; Mrs. Como, Edward Kiah, Earl Como, Salina Recore, Paul Recore and Miss Irene Slamsky, all of Ogdensburg. The boys told of sliding down Ford Avenue with Richard Como while Mr. and Mrs. Recore testified about hearing a crash and going to the scene and finding the Como boy seriously injured. Miss Slamsky testified about seeing the boy and the car go by but did not witness the crash.
    Police Chief Herbert S. Myers of Ogdensburg told of talking with Fleming at the police station during which the driver of the car declared he was afraid to report the accident becaxise of a previous crash and believed he would lose his license to drive. Attorney FitzGerald brought out the fact that there was no city ordinance allowing sliding on any street in Ogdensburg and that there was no light on the sled. He quoted highway statutes relative to use of streets for sliding.

    - Oct. 3, 1942: Pvt. Earl Como transferred from the quartermasters corps at Camp Lee, Va., to the Army Air Base at Daniel Field, Augusta, Ga. He graduated from the B.C. school at Camp Lee.

    - Oct. 30, 1942: Pvt. Earl Como transferred from Daniel Field, Ga., to the 903 Quartermaster Co., 7th Detachment, U.S. Army Air Forces, Drew Field, Tampa Fla. has served six months in the service.

    - Nov. 6, 1942: Soldier Takes Bride. Pvt. and Mrs. Earl C. Como. Miss.Cayen Is Bride Of Pvt, E. C. Como
    In an informal ceremony yesterday at 4 p.m., Elizabeth Mae Cayen, 19, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Caven of 923 Congress St., became the bride of Private Earl Como, 22, son ot Mrs. Elizabeth Como of Utica, N. Y. at St. John's Episcopal Church with Rev. Charles E. Kennedy officiating. They were attended by Mrs. Catherine Martin, sister of the bride and George Pitcher, brother-in-law of the groom.
    The bride was atired in a royal blue velvet street length dress with matching accessories and her shoulder bouquet was of pink roses. The matron of honor wore brown wool with matching accessories and a corsage of yellow roses identical to those worn by the bride. Following the ceremony, a wedding supper was held at the home of the bride's parents with members of the immediate families attending.
    Due to the brevity of Pvt. Como's stay, they will be unable to make a wedding trip. He is home on furlough from Drew Field located at Tampa, Florida, where he has recently been stationed. Pvt. Como entered the army in June of this year. The bride is a graduate of the June class of the Ogdensburg Free Academy. The groom also attended the Academy and the George Hall Trade School Defense Classes prior to his induction. Mrs. Como plans to remain in Ogdensburg when Pvt. Como returns to his station Sunday of this week.

    - Oct. 1, 1943: Private Earl Como is enjoying a 17-day furlough at the home of his wife and son, 923 Congress St. He is stationed at Drew Field, Tampa, FL.

    - Feb. 25, 1962: Two area men were hospitalized following a two-car head-on collission at the intersection of the Canton-Ogdensburg road and the Arterial Highway Monday, Feb. 19. Injured were Earl Calvin Como, 826 Mechanic St., operator of a 1954 Dodge station wagon. He complained of back, knee and chest injuries. Also injured was Reggie Laton Roy, Heuvelton, who was o9perating a 1960 Pontiac registered to his wife. The front end of the Pontiac operated bv Rov was badly damaged. The left front of the Como wagon was struck and it appears to be a total wreck. The collission took place just west of the intersection.

    - Jan. 12, 1975: In the 1812 map of Ogdensburg at left, lines have been drawn extending Ford and Washington Streets, from the point of the penninsula to the Lafayette Street Bridge and directly through the Oswegatchie dam to act as a reference in locating Fort LaPresentation, (indicated by black arrow). Lines drawn from the same reference points in the aerial photo at right, taken in 1962, indicate that at the same spot, there appears a faint white outline of the same dimensions as Fort LaPresentation, (White arrow). A local man, Earl Como, believes that the outline is the foundation of the Fort and said that an on-site inspection reveals the presence of a ridge which could be the foundation wall of the stone structure, (Map courtesy of Elizabeth Baxter)
    Local Man Believes Fort Site Now Pinpointed

    BY ELIZABETH BAXTER City Historian

    Earl Como, 826 Mechanic St., who has a special enthusiasm for the City of Ogdensburg and its history, has been making a study of its old forts and has come up with some very shrewd and interesting conclusions. He believes the best available map of two of the forts is that published opposite Page 145 in St. Lawrence County by Gates Curtis, printed by D. Mason and Co., Syracuse, in 1894.
    This map shows the French Fort, La Presentation, on the west side of the Oswegatchie River, near the St. Lawrence River, and Oswegatchie Fort, or Redbout, beside the St. Lawrence River, approximately between what now are the north ends of Hamilton and Patterson Streets
    The fort was first built of wood but the same year was rebuilt of stone. The map, titled Ogdensburg in 1812, was prepared by H. J.O. Eng. Co. of Syracuse, according to an identifiying caption. Page 146 of the Curtis history refers to the old stone garrison and its role in the Battle of Ogdensburgh on Feb. 22, 1813.
    The Curtis account refers to \the gateway between the two buildings which formed the stone garrison, protected by cannon. Como points out, particularly, the footnote to Page 149 of the Curtis volume, which reads: The place was left unguarded thereafter (after the Battle of Ogdensburgh), and the barracks were never repaired. The walls and chimneys stood for many years, a monument recalling to mind the efforts made and privations endured by the first white settlers for our benefit.
    The place should have been repaired and preserved by the government, instead of having been ruthlessly destroyed by thoughtless men for mercenary objects. Some of the stone of these ruins may now be seen in the road bed west of the Rome depot. (The Curtis history was published in 1894. The Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburgh Railroad reached the old Village of Ogdensburgh in 1862. Later, the line became the New York Central. What's left of if now is Penn Central.)
    Como doubts that ruins of either fort sank 20 feet in the water, as certain divers have indicated, and points out that the base there is indigenous limestone. "Marine deposits, such as limestone, when near a coastline, generally grade into sandstone and then into shale, Como said. Since the local limestone is of a uniform grade and color, it would appear that the ancient seas that laid them down were a long way from any coast, therefore indicating that the stone under the penninsula are solid strata, ruling out a fracture or fault in this area.
    "The penninsula itself is composed of glacial till heavily intermixed with clay, a combination which is extremely resistant to wave action. It is quite unlikely that any subsidence could deposit the fort under water, nor could it slide off the penninsula. When the R.W and O Railroad reached here what remained of the ruins of the fort were used for fill and the ground was filled in to deep water to provide a freight house for both the railroad and navigation.
    "When this dock was built, the workers built it over the remains of a French gun boat that was scuttled by the French during the French and Indian War. As far as I can determine, she carried 12 guns, three of which were recovered by Nathan Ford in 1802. The other nine, along with the gunboat, are enclosed in the now Mobil dock. It would seem unlikely that the old fort could leapfrog over this dock and deposit itself practically intact, into the bed of the Oswegatchie."
    Como said he contacted Dr. Morey, head of the geology department at St. Lawrence University, and "he agreed with the information I gave him without being definite. Scientists are a cautious lot and a slight affirmative from one of them is analogous to a firm conviction on the part of most anyone else. He suggested that I send him any material that I could find and he and with his associates would study it."
    Como maintains that a point 150 feet north of the dock, mentioned by the divers, would put the ruins in the ship channel which has been periodically dredged by the Army Corps of Engineers to maintain a depth of 19 feet, as indicated by navigation maps printed in 1939 and 1959. "These also check with the depths given by Gates Curtis," he said. Como said that his investigation places the site of Fort LaPresentation at the end of Commerce Street and just east of railroad tracks which extend to the end of the penninsula. He said he located the site by using triangulation, drawing lines from physical objects which were known to exist and are located on the map drawn in 1812.
    "Extending Ford and Washington Streets placed the fort just between these two lines. Extending a line through the Oswegatchie dam left the fort just east of this line as it bisected the other two and a fourth line drawn from the east side of the penninsula and south, passed directly through the fort."
    Como then took an aerial photo of the site taken in 1962, and drew the same lines. He discovered that at the exact spot where the fort should be located, there appeared on the aerial photo a faint outline the same size as the fort was indicated to be. Located at one corner of the site is a home occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Duffy.
    An investigation at the site on Friday revealed the presence of a distinct ridge circiling the area and forming a rough square, indicate that there exists a solid mass running under the soil which is about two feet wide. "It appeared that two foundation walls of the Duffy home were a part of the square and an examination of these walls revealed a curious angle in their construction which indicated that they cold have been a part of a butress of the fort and that the house was built using these walls as part of the foundation. We found that there is a distinct difference in the style of construction of the walls which is further evidence that some portions were added to what was already there."
    Como said that there is no doubt in his mind that the fort was located at this site and that the presence of the ridge, and the odd construction of the walls indicate that they may very well be the foundations of LaPresentation. Permission is being sought from the owners to probe the ridge areas to determine if a foundation wall actually exists at these areas, he said. This would be, for Mr. Como, a contribution to the success of the American bicentennial locally.

    Earl married Elizabeth May Cayen on 5 Nov 1942 in St John's Episcopal Church, Ogdensburg, NY. Elizabeth (daughter of Edward Pitrie Cayen and Mary Dorothy Walling) was born on 31 Jul 1923 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 20 Jul 1969 in Boston, MA; was buried on 23 Jul 1969 in Ogdensburg, NY. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]

    Children:
    1. Richard Earl Como was born on 24 Mar 1943 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    2. Christopher William Como was born on 14 Sep 1944 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    3. Mary Catherine Como was born on 22 Sep 1945 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    4. Edward Theodore Como was born on 16 Oct 1946 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    5. Timothy Walling Como was born on 8 Mar 1949 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    6. Barbara Elizabeth Como was born on 29 May 1952 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    7. Donald John Como was born on 27 Mar 1954 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    8. Roberta Jean Como was born on 10 May 1955 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    9. Steven David Como was born on 22 Dec 1957 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 9 May 2021 in Huntsville, AL.
    10. Ann Dorothy Como was born on 1 Jan 1959 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    11. Thomas Joseph Como was born on 30 Jan 1960 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    12. Sylvia Ruth Como was born on 24 Apr 1962 in Ogdensburg, NY.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Earl Como was born on 24 Aug 1891 in Ogdensburg, NY (son of John W. Como and Delila Thayer); died on 24 Oct 1951 in Utica, NY; was buried in Utica, NY.

    Notes:

    - 1900 census: Ogdensburg, John is eight years old and living with his father John Como (42) and his grandmother Marinda (65) at 83 King St. He was born in August of 1891.

    - 1910 census: Earl J. Como is 18 years old and living at the home of his father John Como on Lake St. Also living with him is his sister Leona Porter and her son David.

    - Ogdensburg Daily Journal: Married: Como-Recore. In this city Monday, Sept. 30, 1912, at the parsonage of the First Congregational Church, 34 King St., by Rev. Andrew M. Wight, Earl Como and Elizabeth Recore, both of Ogdensburg.

    - 1915 census: Earl Como, 23; Lizzie, 21; John F., 3 months and John Como, 58, reside Commerce St.

    - June 5, 1917: WWI registration: John Earl Como, employed as a coaler by the New York Central Railroad, has wife and two children, is 5' 10" of medium build with brown eyes and hair.

    - 1920 census has at Ring Street, Ogdensburg, Second Ward, Earl J. Como, 27; Elizabeth, 25; John F., 5; M.Leona, 3; Harold, 1; Calvin E., 0; and John C. Como, 63.

    - 1925 New York State census: John E. Como is 32 years old and is living at 106 Riverside Ave., Ogdensburg with his wife Elizabeth, 31; children John F., 11; Margaret L., 9; Harold R., 7; Earl C., 5; Blanche E., 4; Bernice M., 2; and Gladys J., 0; and with his father, John C. Como, 58. He is working as a fireman on the New York Centrol Railroad.

    - 1925 city directory: J Earl (Elizabeth) fireman NYCRR, h 106 Riverside Ave.

    - 1930 (April 19) census has Richard Como, 12; Earl Como, 12; and Bernice Como, 5, all boarding with the Moses Lajoie family on Pine Street. Moses is 35, his wife Agnes is 35. At the same time (April 15, 1930) in 1930 census at Utica, are Donald J. Davidson, 38; Burford, 18; Donald, 11; Earl J. Como, 38; John Francis Como, 15; Margaret L., 14; Elizabeth, 8; and Dorothy, 11 months; and Leona P. Como, 34. This is the 16th Ward of Utica, Block no. 26. North Gennessee St. John's wife Elizabeth Como, 36, is living with her sister Lena LaBuff, 38, in Ogdensburg.

    - 1940 census has Earl Como, 48, single, and his sister Leona Como, 46, married, residing with Donald J. Davidson in Utica. He is listed as housekeeper and Leona as laundress. He is not single of course and his wife and family are in Ogdensburg.

    - 1940 census. At 26 Commerce St., Ogdensburg (highest grade completed: 1939 income, weeks worked in 1939) are Elizabeth Como, head, 46, 5th, maid, private residence, 140, 28; John, 25, laborer, 8th, construction co., 720, 50; Earl, 21, laborer, 11th, WPA, 360, 16; Elizabeth, 18, maid, 11, private res., 144, 48; Bernice, 17, 11; Dorothy, 10, 5; Robert, 9, 3; Howard, 8, 1. Earl was earning $22.50 wk; while John earned $14 wk. Earl began work about Sept. 1, 1939.
    At 24 Commerce St. was Edward Day, 65; Cora, 58; James, 19; Vernon, 17 and Beatrice Day Patterson, 32. At 20 Commerce were Henry Wicks, 45; Mary, 42; Dorothy, 21; Joseph, 19; Albert, 17; Shirley, 14; and Betty, 9.
    On the other side of the Comos, at 3 Gibbs St., were Angelo Vinch, 50; Clara, 45; and sons Adrian, 21; and Chester, 15; daughter Aden, 24, married to John Gilbo, 30; and their var. kids; and daughter Flora, 26, married to Walter Mills, 27.

    - 1942 Draft Registration: 468 Columbia St., Utica; born Aug. 24, 1891; Unemployed.

    - June 19, 1944, John E. Como Jr. was registered at Chicago, IL as an employee of the U.S. Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. He was residing at the Ewing Hotel, Clark St., Chicago; SS number 118-10-7124. Employed as a trucker.

    - John Earl Como died Oct. 24, 1951 in Utica, New York at the age of 60. Cause of death was a heart attack suffered in the home of his sister, Mrs. Leona Davidson with whom he was residing. He was born Aug. 24, 1891 to John and Delia Thayer Como. Survived by his wife, the former Miss Elizabeth Recore, four sons; John Como (Rome), Earl Como (Ogdensburg), Robert Como (with the Air Corps) and Howard Como (U.S. Army), and four daughters; Mrs. Wesley Pitcher (Potsdam), Mrs. John Rivenbark (North Carolina), Mrs. William Redmond (Oneida) and Mrs. Clifford Buffham (Potsdam) and 22 grandchildren.

    - John Como roved around quite a bit. He worked for a time as a fireman on the N.Y. Central Railroad. Tim Como has two of his letters to Earl Como and a small diary that John E. Como kept during his travels.

    Newspaper Reports:

    - Jan. 24, 1912: Alfred James Blakely, Earl Como and Lawrence Ladouceur appeared in court charged with burglary third degree and grand larceny second degree which occurred at Ogdensburg Nov. 6, 1911. Mr. Donavin appears for Blakely and Como.

    - Feb. 5, 1912: Alfred J. Blakely, Earl Como and Lawrence Ladoucer pleaded guilty to burglary, third degree, and grand larceny, second degree, committed at Ogdensburg on Nov. 6, 1911. Alfred Blakely sentenced to Elmira reformatory, sentence suspended; Earl Como of Ogdensburg, suspended sentence; Lawrence Ladouceur of Ogdensburg, one year at Dannemora; also one year at Dannemora for robbery.

    - Feb. 14, 1912: Earl Como, Lawrence Ladouceur and Alfred J. Blakely. the three Ogdensburg youths who burglarized the Surprise Store and who had pleaded guilty to burglary in the third degree and grand larceny in the second, were disposed of by giving Laaouceur who has not made good on a former suspended sentence, one year at Dannemora, and sending the other two to Elmira Reformatory and suspending the sentence. There was an understanding that Blakely is to enlist in the U.S. Navy within 30 days.

    - Sept. 30, 1912: Married: COMO-RECORE. In this city Monday, Sept.. 30, 1912, at the parsonage of the First Congregational Church, 34 King Street, by Rev. Andrew M. Wight, Earl Como and Miss Elizabeth Recore, both of Ogdensburg.

    - Aug. 23, 1917: John Earl Como passed the draft board physical exam.

    - Sept. 17, 1917: Saturday afternoon the police officers, rounded up three young men for breaking into a freight car in the N.Y.C. yards, and taking away a quantity of the goods that had been packed by the Ogdensburg Wholesale Mercantile company and was to be shipped to Lyons Falls. The goods consisted of yarn, socks and pants. The three men arrested were James Brenno, Willie Brenno and Earl Como. The police had been working on this case for the past few days and on visiting the haunts of these men and not finding them around, became suspicious. Saturday morning Offocer Amo started looking for Brenno. When a policeman came to Brenno's home, he spied his man about two blocks away and finally overtook him. He was taken in a car to the police station. After talking with Brenno a subpoena was issued for Como. Como agreed to appear in the afternoon and when he did he was locked up.
    Then the officers found Willie Brenno and arrested him. After searching the premises of Como, some of the missing articles were found packed away inside a couch and a large Morris chair, more of the goods were found in the attic of Brenno's house. These goods were all brought to the station by the police. All the articles have not been found. The men were questioned by Assistant District Attorney Ingram to find out if there were any more mixed up in the case, and to find out where the rest of the missing articles were. As the defendants are charged with breaking car seals, which is an offense against the federal law, the case may be transferred to the U. S. Court.

    - Tuesday, Oct. 2, 1917: William Brenno, James Brenno his brother, and Earl Como of Ogdensburg, were jointly indicted for burglary third degree and petit larceny. Pleas of guilty were entered by the Brennos and one of not guilty by Como. James Brenno was sent to Dannemora for a year, William Brenno received a suspended sentence but will be in the care of the probation officer for a year. Daniel W. Mulligan represented them.

    - October, 1917: October court term closes. Earl Como hails from Ogdensburg and is under indictment for burglary in the third degree and petit larceny, and the district attorney said that his wife needed him at home, and that he was willing that the case go over and he be allowed to go on his own recognizance until next term, which was done.

    - Oct. 5, 1917: James Brenno, William Brenno and Earl Como, Ogdensburg, charged with burglary, third degree, and petit larceny. Plea of James Brenno, guilty; sentence, one year at Dahnemora; William Brenno, guilty, sentence suspended and placed in care of probation officer one year; Earl Como, not guilty.

    - July 23, 1923: Earl Como reported to the police last night that as he was going up New York avenue in his car Saturday night he had a slight collision with Laroek's delivery truck. The vehicles just touched and no damage resulted.

    - Oct. 14, 1930: The case against Earl Como, arrested for disorderly conduct, was dismissed on lack of evidence.

    - Fall, 1931: Earl Como, city, was arrested this morning on a charge of public intoxication. He will be arraigned Monday.

    - Jan. 25, 1932: Earl Como, 39, of Ogdensburg, who has been free on bail since last month when the grand jury indicted him for burglary, third degree and petit larceny, was surrendered at the county jail Saturday night by his bondsman, Joseph Sovel. Sovel posted $500 bond guaranteeing Como's appearance at the arraignment term today, but on Saturday, he decided to discontinue his financial support. Como is the father of Richard Como, Ogdensburg youth who was struck and killed by an Ogdensburg driver several weeks ago.

    - Tues., Jan. 26, 1932: The usual term of county court was held the 25th. In the following case, pleas of not guilty were entered: Earl Como, burglary third degree and petit larceny, committed at Ogdensburg. Robert S. Waterman assigned.

    - Feb. 2, 1932: Earl Como, indicted for burglary third degree and petit larceny entered a plea of guilty to petit jarceny, the District Attorney stating that the grand Jury recommended leniency. Robert S. Waterman represented him by assignment. He said he was all right when he was not drinking, but that had been most of the time for two or three years. Como has previously been convicted of a felony and consequently, had he pleaded to the indictment would have got a long term. He was placed on probation for three years.

    - Feb. 2, 1932 - The trial of Earl Fleming, Ogdensburg, driver of the car which struck and killed 12-year-old Richard Como in that city several weeks ago will certainly take place in County Court here this week, as a result of Judge Dolan's action yesterday in denying the motion of Fleming's attorney to put the case over the term. Earl Como, father of the dead youth, who was indicted for burglary, third degree and petit larceny by the same grand jury that Indicted Fleming for leaving the scene of an accident without reporting, pleaded guilty here Monday afternoon to the petit larceny charge and was placed on probation for two years. The theory that the facts brought out during the arraignment of the dead boy's father might influence trial jurors who were sitting in the courtroom at the time, was the basis of Attorney Edmund FitzGerald's motion to put the case over the term. Fleming's lawyer also sought to delay trial of his client hy making a motion for examination of the grand jury minutes taken at the time of Fleming's indictment. The motion was denied. Mr. FitzGerald claimed there was a discrepancy in the testimony as to whether or not Fleming reported to Chief H. S. Myers within an hour following the accident. No date has been set for the Fleming trial but it probably will not be reached before Thursday.

    March 5, 1932: Earl Como of this city, on probation for a conviction of burglary, third degree and petit larceny was admitted to the St. Lawrence County jail at Canton Friday for alleged violation of the probation. Under indictment for burglary third degree and petit larceny, he was permitted to go on his own recognizance and his case sent over the term on the recommendation of the district attorney who asserted that his wife needed him at home very badly. (John Earl Como's diary mentions that in 1932 he visited his cousin Leona Thayer at 622 Avondale Ave. in Toledo, Ohio. This is Delia Thayer's sister and she is included among the children of Robert and Harriet living in Toledo in the 1880 census.)

    - June 15, 1933, Ogdensburg Journal: Canton, June 15 - The jury was unable to agree in the case of Elizabeth Como as administratrix of the estate of Richard Como against Earl Fleming after a trial yesterday in county court. At 5:30 o'clock the jury reported it was unable to agree and County Judge James C. Dolen sent it back with instructions to try and arrive at a verdict by 6. When that time came, the panel announced it was hopelessly divided. Mrs. Como, mother of the 13-year-old Ogdensburg boy who was fatally injured while coasting down Ford Avenue at Main Street, Ogdensburg, early the evening of Jan. 3, 1932, was represented by Attorney John Livingston while Attorney Edmund FitzGerald handled the case for the defendant. At the conclusion of the plaintiffs presentation Attorney FitzGerald moved for dismissal of the action on the ground that the plaintiff had failed to make out a case. Motion was denied whereupon Mr. FitzGerald declined to offer an evidence and let the case go to the jury. Witnesses for the plaintiff were Mrs. Como, Edward Kiah, Earl Como, Salina Recore, Paul Recore and Miss Irene Slamsky, all of Ogdensburg. The boys told of sliding down Ford Avenue with Richard Como while Mr. and Mrs. Recore testified about hearing a crash and going to the scene and finding the Como boy seriously injured. Miss Slamsky testified about seeing the boy and the car go by but did not witness the crash.
    Police Chief Herbert S. Myers of Ogdensburg told of talking with Fleming at the police station during which the driver of the car declared he was afraid to report the accident because of a previous crash and believed he would lose his license to drive. Attorney FitzGerald brought out the fact that there was no city ordinance allowing sliding on any street in Ogdensburg and that there was no light on the sled. He quoted highway statutes relative to use of streets for sledding.

    John married Elizabeth Recore on 30 Sep 1912 in Ogdensburg, NY. Elizabeth (daughter of Francois Recore and Marguerite Dumas) was born on 12 Sep 1893 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 10 Dec 1991 in Waterville, NY. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 3.  Elizabeth Recore was born on 12 Sep 1893 in Huntingdon, Quebec (daughter of Francois Recore and Marguerite Dumas); died on 10 Dec 1991 in Waterville, NY.

    Notes:

    - Elizabeth Record was born in Huntingdon, Quebec in 1893 and at age 3, in 1896, the family moved to Malone, NY where they are found in the 1900 census: Frank Recore, 41; Margaret, 42; Elick, 18; Joseph, 15; Mary, 13; Paul, 11; Lena, 9; Lizzie, 6; John, 5; and Nina, 2.

    - Marriage license was issued in the Town of Oswegatchie, St. Lawrence County, Sept. 30, 1912.

    - Elizabeth Recore Como Baseliere died Dec. 10, 1991 at the Harding Nursing Home. The funeral was at Nichols Funeral Home in Ogdensburg, and burial was in Ogdensburg Cemetery. She was born in Huntingdon, Quebec, 12 Sep 1893 to Frank and Margaret Dumas Recore. She married John Earl Como 3 Sep 1912 in St. John's Church. She was predeceased by two sons, John Francis and Richard; three daughters, Elizabeth Rivenbark, Doris Como, and Gladys Como; a sister, Melvina Wicks; and two brothers, George and Alexander Recore. She is survived by three sons, Earl (Ogdensburg), Robert William (Rome), and Howard Edward (Utica). ; three daughters; Mrs. William (Bernice) Redmond, Canastota; Dorothy Godkin, South Carolina, and Mrs. Wesley (Margaret) Pitcher, Potsdam; 38 grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.

    Following from the Commercial Advertiser, Canton, NY
    Tue., Feb. 14, 1933
    A jury was partially drawn in the case of Elizabeth Como as Admx. v. Earl Fleming, an action to recover for the death of a young boy who was hit by the car of defendant while sliding in the city of Ogdensburg and who received injuries form which he soon died. This accident occurred Jan. 3, 1932. In examining the jury, John H. Livingston, attorney for the plaintiff, asked the jury if the fact that the defendant was running a load of booze at the time of the accident would prejudice them. Edmund Fitzgerald for the defendant, was at once on his feet with a motion to withdraw a juror and put the case over on the ground that the question tended to prejudice the case of the defendant, and after some consideration, the motion was granted.

    June 20, 1933
    Wednesday morning saw the reconvening of County Court, and Thursday afternoon the close of the term. The action of Elizabeth Como as Administratrix of Richard Como, a thirteen year old boy, against Earl Fleming, was tried. The parties come from Ogdensburg.
    On the evening of January 3, 1932, Richard Como, his brother and another boy were sliding down Ford Avenue and across Main Street, a much travelled street. His brother went first and crossed Main Street in safety; Richard came next, lying flat on his stomach, and was killed instantly; the third boy saw the car, turned his sled into a snow bank and escaped injury.
    Strange to say no one saw the collision between the sled and car; no one can say whether the sled was in motion or had come to a stop; this is very mportant because under the decisions apparently if the sled were in motion no recovery could be had, while if it had come to a stop perhaps one could be sustained. The boy had no light on his sled and Main Street was not a street on which children were permitted to slide under the terms of any ordinance of the city. One witness testified that the car of the defendant was going between forty and fifty miles an hour just prior to the accident; the defendant, told the boy's mother that he did not see the boy or know he had struck him, and that was the reason he did not sooner report the accident; the Chief of Police said he reported it about three hours after it occurred and said that the reason he did not do so sooner was that he had been in a previous accident and feared if this one were reported it might cost him his license.
    At the close of the plaintiff's case the defense moved for a non-suit, and this being denied went to the jury on the evidence offered by plaintiff and urged that the evidence showed that the boy was undeniably guilty of contributory negligence. The jury struggled with the case several hours, failed to agree and were discharged at six Wednesday night. John J. Livingston represented the plaintiff, Edmund Fitzgerald the defendant.

    - Dec. 20, 1939: The fire department was called to the home of Mrs. Earl Como, 26 Commerce St., at 7:50 last evening where a chimney was burning out. An alarm was sounded from Box 14, New York avenue and Main street. The damage was slight.

    Children:
    1. Blanche Elizabeth Como was born on 26 Sep 1921 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 1 Jun 1982 in Wilmington, NC.
    2. Dorothy Marion Como was born on 4 Apr 1929 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 2 Nov 1999 in Beaumont, TX.
    3. William Robert Como was born on 17 Aug 1930 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 22 Mar 2004 in Rome, NY.
    4. James Howard Como was born on 3 Oct 1931 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 15 Oct 2004 in Utica, NY.
    5. John Francis Como was born on 10 Jul 1914 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 1 Mar 1978 in Rome, NY; was buried on 4 Mar 1978 in Rome, NY.
    6. Margaret Leona Como was born on 1 Apr 1916 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 25 Jan 1993 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    7. Harold Richard Como was born in 1918 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 4 Jan 1932 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg, NY.
    8. 1. Earl Calvin Como was born on 8 Dec 1919 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 10 Nov 1996 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried on 12 Nov 1996 in Ogdensburg Cemetery, NY.
    9. Bernice Mae Como was born on 21 Apr 1923 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 24 Jan 1998 in Canastota, NY.
    10. Gladys Joyce Como was born in 1925 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 16 Feb 1940 in Batavia, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg, NY.
    11. Doris Como was born on 12 Apr 1927 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 31 Mar 1928 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried about 1927 in Ogdensburg, NY.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  John W. Como was born in Dec 1857 in Ogdensburg, NY (son of Nelson Como and Marinda Tyrrell); died on 4 Jun 1929 in Yorkville, NY; was buried in Jun 1930 in Ogdensburg, NY.

    Notes:

    - 1860 U.S. census: John is 3 years old and is living with parents Nelson and Marinda "Commo" in Ogdensburg's First Ward. He was born in New York State.

    - 1865 N.Y. state census, Ogdensburg 4th ward: John is 6 years old and is living with his parents Nelson and Marinda Como.

    - Aug. 27, 1866, Ogdensburg Daily Journal: A gang of seven boys, the oldest, about fifteen years, the youngest seven, were arrested by Officer King yesterday morning for robbing gardens of fruit. They were committed to the lockup to await trial, and there is good prospect that some of them will be sent to the House of Refuge. For some time this gang has been carrying on their transactions to the great annoyance of garden proprietors residing on the west side of the Bridge. It is hoped that their arrest will prove a warning to all boys who have an itching for the choice fruit, of our village gardens. Upon trial six of these boys, named Paul Denny, George LaDuke, Thomas Mason, Solomon Gadbaw, William Como and John Como, were convicted, and are now in the lockup, their sentence having been held under advisement.

    - 1870 U.S census: John is 12 years old and is livig with his parents Nelson and Marinda Como.

    - On 19 June 1886, marriage of John W. Como and Delila Thayer, 17, in Ogdensburg, N.Y. Witnesses were Mary Thayer and John Thayer. This is John's first marriage. John will be 28 on his next birthday. Delila was born in East Saginaw, MI to Robert Thayer and Harriet Rehor. This is her first marriage. Married at the Congregational parsonage by the Rev. J. S. Ainslie.

    - 1900 U.S. Census: John is 42 years old and is living at 83 King St. His wife died the previous year. He is working as a fireman in a stove factory. Living with him are his children Blanche, 11; Earl, 8; Leona, 6; his mother Marinda, 65 and a boarder, Stacy Norman, 25. John was born in NY state but his parents were born in Canada. He was born in December of 1857.

    - 1905 NYS census: Residing on Ogden Street are John C. Como, 48, Irene Como, his mother, 72; son John E. 13; daugh. Pearl L., 11; Louis Todd, 27; Maud Todd, 23; William Todd, 1; and Edna Todd, one month. Missing is Blanche, who would be 16.

    - 1910 U.S. census: John Como is 53 years old and living on Lake St. with his son Earl J., 18; daughter Leona Porter, 16; and her son David E. Porter, two months. John Como is listed as being a widower.

    - 1925 New York census: John C. Como is 68 years old and is living at the home of his son, John E. Como and his family at 106 Riverside Ave. in Ogdensburg.

    - Ogdensburg city directory, 1925, Como John, lab, b 106 Riverside Ave. (house of John Earl Como.)

    - June 9, 1929: The funeral of John Como, 65, (he was 71) who died at Yorkville Tuesday, (June 4, 1929) was held Thursday (June 6) at the home of Fred B. Vallance, 923 Morris Street. Rev. L. P. Franklin conducted services and burial was in the Ogdensburg Cemetery, Mr. Como went to Yorkville last February to reside with his daughter, Miss Leona Como. A son, Earl Como, of Ogdensburg, also survives. Mr. Como was a brother of William Como of Tampa, Fla.; George Como, Mrs. Vina Nevin and Mrs. Minnie Hoadley of Ogdensburg.

    - John Como, age 61, (71) died June 4, 1929 at the home of his daughter, Miss Leona Como, in Yorkville, N.Y. He is survived by one son, Earl, of Ogdnesburg, a daughter, Leona of Yorkville, two brothers, George Como of Ogdensburg, and William of Tampa, Florida, and two sisters, Mrs. Minnie Hoadley, and Mrs. Vina Nevins, of Ogdensburg. The funeral was from the home of Fred Vallance, 923 Morris St. in Ogdensburg, and interment will be made in Ogdensburg Cemetery.

    - Ogdensburg Cemetery index reads "Como John - located at Range 20 Lot 18." There is no stone at that location. Earl Como remembers the funeral being in the Ogdensburg Cemetery when he was very young. He said he recalls a small hill being nearby.

    - John was a laborer. Earl Como wrote that his grandfather was very acrobatic, and was an alcoholic. He went to his daughter Leona's to live in Feb. 1930 when his health was very poor and died four months later. John's obituary gives his age as 61, but he must have been 71 or 72 at the time of his death. The fact that he was born in late 1857 or early 1858 is shown by all the census records and his marriage record.

    John married Delila Thayer on 19 Jun 1886 in Ogdensburg, NY. Delila (daughter of William Robert Thayer and Harriet Rehor) was born in Aug 1869 in East Saginaw, MI; died on 9 Nov 1899 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg, NY. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 5.  Delila Thayer was born in Aug 1869 in East Saginaw, MI (daughter of William Robert Thayer and Harriet Rehor); died on 9 Nov 1899 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg, NY.

    Notes:

    - Delilah Thayer died Nov. 9, 1899. She was 30 years old and was a housewife. Cause of death was phthesis (tuberculosis.) Dr. Benton was attending physician. She is buried in the Ogdensburg Cemetery. Cemetery index reads "Thayer (Como) Delhia - located at Range 10 Lot 89." Tim Como visited the site and there is no stone there, The index also lists "Como Delia - located at Range 10 Lot 4." Also under Como is "Como Delhia Thayer - located at Range 10 Lot 89."

    - Marriage certificate from New York state Bureau of Vital Statistics: June 19, 1886, marriage of John W. Como and Delila Thayer. Delila is 17 years old and lives in Ogdensburg, N.Y. She was born in East Saginaw, Michigan to Robert Thayer and Harriet Rehor. This is her first marriage. Witnesses were her sister and brother: Mary Thayer and John Thayer.

    - 1870 census, East Saginaw, Michigan: Delia is 10 months old and is living with her parents Robert Thayer (30) and Harriet Thayer (30), and siblings Caroline (12), Alfred (7) and Mary (2). Also living with them is Sylvester Thayer (18).

    - John Earl Como's diary mentions that in 1932 he visited his cousin Leona Thayer at 622 Avondale Ave. in Toledo, Ohio.

    - St. Lawrence Republican, Nov. 15, 1899: Died in this city Nov. 9, Della Thayer, wife of John Como, aged 80 years.

    Children:
    1. infant Como was born about 1887 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 23 Apr 1888 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    2. Blanche Como was born in Jan 1889 in Ogdensburg, NY; died about 1906 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    3. 2. John Earl Como was born on 24 Aug 1891 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 24 Oct 1951 in Utica, NY; was buried in Utica, NY.
    4. Leona Pearl Como was born in Jul 1893 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 10 Oct 1964 in Utica, NY.

  3. 6.  Francois Recore was born on 20 Nov 1858 in Saint Michel, Napierville, Quebec (son of Maxime Ricard and Marie Salome Guillot); died on 26 May 1934 in Ogdensburg, NY.

    Notes:

    - Known as Frank Recore.

    - 1891 Census of Canada. Francois Ricard is residing in Huntingdon Village, Hundington, Quebec, identified as Frank Recor, 40, with wife Marguerite 35, and children Philomene, 10; Alexander, 8; Joseph, 6; Marie, 4; Paul, 2; and Helena, one month. All were born in Quebec. Residing next door are his parents, Maxime Ricard, identified as Michael Recor, 75, and wife Salome Recor, 72. Living with them is their daughter Marguerite, identified as Margaret Sorel, 23, her husband Joseph Sorel, 24, and their children Joseph, 3, and Dominick, 4 mos.

    - 1905 N.Y. State census, Franklin County, Malone, at 30 coffee St., are Frank (45) and Maggie (40) who have been in the U.S. for 9 years; with children Alex (22), Joe (21), Paul (17), Lena (15), Lizzie (13), John (8), Melvina (6) and George (4). John, George and Melvina were born in the U.S., all others were born in Canada.

    - 1910 census: At Malone are Frank Recore, 51; Maggie, 52; Joseph, 26; Helen, 20; Alec, 28; Paul, 22; Lena, 19; Lizzie, 16; Vina, 12, and George, 9.

    - 1915: Frank Recore, 57 and Maggie, 58, reside on River Street, Ward 2, Ogdensburg, with Alexander, 32; John, 18; Vina, 17; and George, 13. Nearby on Commerce St. are Earl Como, 23; Elizabeth, 21; John F., three months; and John Como, 58.

    - 1920: Frank, 60, and Margaret, 61, are in Ogdensburg with son Alex, 36.

    - 1925 N.Y. State Census, St. Lawrence County, Ogdensburg, Frank Recore (65) and his wife Margaret (66) are living at 24 Commerce St with one son, Alex (42). Frank's occupation is listed as "Housework".

    - Earl C. Como said all of Frank's children were born in Huntingdon, except Melvina and George who were born in Malone after Frank moved the family there around 1900. The children were put to work there picking hops, until Frank moved the family to Ogdensburg around 1911. Frank fell under a trolley early in his life and lost both legs right around the knees. He used to sell pencils out of a cup in downtown Ogdensburg. According to Earl Como, he never learned to speak English.

    - George Recore had a marriage certificate for Frank Recore and Maggy Dumas. The ceremony was performed at Constable, N.Y. The third digit in the year was unclear, but the date was either 1848 or 1878, and so must be 1878.

    - Ogd. Advance of May 27, 1934, lists the death of Frank Recore, 76, on May 26, at his home at 23 River St., after an illness of six months. He was born in Quebec and came to Ogdensburg from Malone in 1909 (they are still at Malone in 1910.) In his early life, he suffered the loss of both legs in a railway accident. He was employed as a shoemaker until 1929. He is survived by his widow, Margaret Dumas Recore, whom he married 55 years ago. The body was removed to the home of his son Paul at 421 NY Ave. where the funeral was held from there, and Notre Dame Church.

    Francois married Marguerite Dumas about 1878 in Constable, NY. Marguerite (daughter of Hyancinthe Joseph Dumas and Rosalee Faubert) was born on 15 Nov 1859 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 8 Aug 1936 in Lisbon, NY; was buried on 11 Aug 1936 in Ogdensburg, NY. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 7.  Marguerite Dumas was born on 15 Nov 1859 in Ormstown, Quebec (daughter of Hyancinthe Joseph Dumas and Rosalee Faubert); died on 8 Aug 1936 in Lisbon, NY; was buried on 11 Aug 1936 in Ogdensburg, NY.

    Notes:

    - Mrs. Francis Recore died at the age of 78 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George LaBoeuf (LaBuff) Canton Road, Town of Lisbon, N.Y. She was born in Burke, N.Y. to Joseph and Margaret Herbert Dumas. The funeral was held at the home of her son, Paul Recore on 421 N.Y. Ave in Ogdensburg. Burial was to be in Notre Dame Cemetery in Ogdensburg, N.Y. At the time of her death, Margaret Dumas had a sister, Mrs. Ann Blanchard living in Montreal, and another, Mrs. Rose Reall (Mrs. Rose Ricoli according to the Advance) living in Huntingdon, Quebec. She was survived by children Alex (Ogdensburg), Joseph (Malone), John (Hartford, Conn), Paul (Ogdensburg), George (Ogdensburg), Mrs. George LeBoeuf (Lisbon), Mrs. Earl Como (Ogdensburg) and Mrs. Henry Wicks (Ogdensburg).

    - NYS Vital Statistics: Margaret Recore died 8 Aug 1936 at 11:30 p.m. in Lisbon, New York of chronic myocardites. Age at death was 78 years. She was born in Burke, New York to Joseph Dumas and Margaret Herbert, both of whom were also born in Burke, N.Y.. She was buried n Notre Dame Cemetery on 11 Aug. 1936. She was the widow of Frank Recore.

    - 1925 N.Y. State census, Ogdensbureg, Margaret Recore is 66 years old and living at 24 Commerce St. with her husband, Frank (65) and one son, Alex (42).

    Children:
    1. Marie Philomene Recore was born on 23 Apr 1881 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died in Dec 1914 in Malone, NY.
    2. Louis Alexander Salome Recore was born on 5 Mar 1883 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 19 Aug 1972 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Notre Dame Cemetery, Ogdensburg, NY.
    3. Joseph H. Recore was born on 12 Aug 1884 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 27 Nov 1959 in Malone, NY.
    4. Paul R. Recore was born on 1 Feb 1889 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 25 Oct 1961 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Notre Dame Cemetery, Ogdensburg, NY.
    5. John Baptiste Recore was born on 20 Jan 1896 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 19 Jun 1976 in Hartford, CT.
    6. 3. Elizabeth Recore was born on 12 Sep 1893 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 10 Dec 1991 in Waterville, NY.
    7. Melvina Recore was born on 22 Mar 1900 in Malone, NY; died on 13 Sep 1986 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    8. George Recore was born on 13 Oct 1901 in Malone, NY; was christened on 27 Oct 1901 in Notre Dame Church, Malone, NY; died on 2 Oct 1980 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Notre Dame Cemetery, Ogdensburg, NY.
    9. Marie Oliva Lena Recore was born on 14 Mar 1891 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 26 Apr 1971 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    10. Francis Ricard was born on 23 Mar 1879 in Huntingdon, Quebec; died on 16 Nov 1881 in Napierville, Quebec.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Nelson Como was born on 18 May 1810 in Rouville, Quebec (son of Jean Baptiste Comeau and Marie Hypolithe Aupry dit Laramee); died on 7 Mar 1887 in Ogdensburg, NY.

    Notes:


    Timeline:

    - 1810: Nelson Como is born Narcisse Comeau at Rouville, about 15 miles east of Montreal, Quebec, where his father farms. It is a hard life, and Nelson grows up watching various of his siblings die at early ages. When he is 12 in 1822, his last sibling by his natural mother is born at Rouville and lives just two months.
    - The next year, in October, 1823, Nelson's mother dies when he is only 13. His oldest sister Emile married the previous year and has left the home, leaving only Nelson and two sisters, Marie Agathe, 9, and Marie Julie, 7, at home. Six of the 10 children of his mother have died by this point.
    - In July, 1826 when Nelson is 16, his father marries Scholastique Bruneau by whom he had a daughter two months previously. In 1829, Flavie is born and in 1830, Joseph.
    - Between 1835-1838, Nelson comes to Watertown, NY as a hostler (tending horses) at the American Hotel, where he boards.
    - 1839: In the spring, Nelson marries Betsy Marinda Holmes, who lives in a Watertown suburb called Brownville.
    - 1840: Their first son Henry is born. From the 1840 census, it may be that Marinda and baby are still residing with her family.
    - 1840: Marinda's mother, Elizabeth Betsy Holmes, dies.
    - 1841: Nelson junior is born. We don't know whether Nelson/Marinda are still with her father's family or living in rental property.
    - 1843: Eathen is born.
    - 1843-1848: Sometime in 1840s Marinda's father dies and the family scatters. The youngest is a daughter 14-15.
    - 1848: Daughter Frances is born.
    - 1848: Marinda dies. There is a story that Marinda developed arthritis very early in life and was cared for very lovingly by Nelson for several years before she died.
    - 1850, Aug. 13: Nelson is still a hostler for the American Hotel and he is now boarding there. Apparently he has no home for his three sons and his daughter since the boys are scattered around Watertown in various homes and his daughter is with the Stark family in Colton, St. Lawrence County. It may be that Nelson lived with Marinda's family and that after the family broke up, he placed the kids in homes and went back to American Hotel to live while paying support.
    - 1850-51: Nelson relocates to Ogdensburg, NY with his sons, taking a job as a hostler at one of the several stables in the city. Frances remains in Colton where she is found in the 1860 census.
    - 1854: Nelson marries Marinda Tyrrell of Cornwall, Ontario, across the St. Lawrence River from Massena, St. Lawrence, NY.
    - 1855: William, their first son, is born and other children follow.
    - 1860: Nelson's two older sons by Marinda Holmes are living on their own in Ogdensburg: Eathen, 17, is not found in this census while Nelson and Marinda Tyrrell Como are raising their family; Nelson is still a hostler.
    - 1865: Nelson's father dies at Dunham, Quebec.

    Note: William and Marinda had sons Henry in 1840; Nelson in 1841 and Eathen in 1843. Daughter Frances, b. 1848, was found only after a DNA connection. Between 1843 when Eathen was born and 1848 when Frances was born Marinda likely had other children, likely girls who also would have been put up in foster homes and taken the name of their foster parents. Whether in fact she did will have to await DNA connections.
    ................................

    - 1810: St. Jean Baptiste-Rouville Parish record: In the year 1810, the 18 of May, by me, priest who has signed, has been baptized Narcisse, born today, of the legitimous marrriage of Jean-Baptiste Commeau, shoemaker, of this parish, and of Marie Hypolithe Aubry dite Laramée. The godfather and godmother were Jean-Baptiste Gaboury and Marie-Françoise Pépin, who with the father, have said being unable to sign.

    - Nelson arrived at Watertown, NY between 1835-1838. He is not found in the 1835 NYS census, but is found in the 1840 Directory for the City of Watertown: Como, N, hustler, American (hustler is a mispelling of hostler, which refers to one employed to look after horses for an Inn or other establishment.) Nelson tended horses for the American Hotel where he resided.

    - 1850: Watertown, Nelson Como, age 35, male, born in Canada. (By this date, Nelson had four children by his first wife Marinda Holmes, who died in 1847-48. The children had been placed in various families in the Watertown area. By 1854, he was living in Ogdensburg where on Oct. 17, he married Marrinda Turrill.)

    - 1860, St. Lawrence County, Ogdensburg, 1st Ward, Nelson Commo is 47 years old, working as a Hoster (hostler) and was born in Canada. He is listed as not being able to read or write. He is living with wife Marinda (25), and three sons William (5), John (3) and George (6 months). Nelson and Marinda were both born in Canada, all three sons were born in New York state.

    - 1863 Ogdensburg city directory: Como, Nelson, laborer, h. Main near RR

    - 1865 N.Y. state census, Ogdensburg, Nelson is 52 and working as a hostler. He is listed as having been born in Canada. He is living with his wife Marinda (32) and children William (7), John (6), George (4) and maria (3).

    - 1869 Ogdensburg directory: Como, Nelson, laborer, h. near King between Lawrence & Jefferson Aves.

    - 1870, Ogdensburg, Nelson is 54, born in Canada. He is working as a day laborer. He is living with his wife Marida (38) and children William (14), John (12), George (10) and Lavina (1). All the children were born in New York state.

    - 1880, Ogdensburg 2nd Ward, Nelson is 68 years old and is working as a laborer. He is living on Albany Avenue with his wife Marinda (44) and children William (24), John, 22; George (20), Lavina (11) and Mary (7). Living next door on one side are Ethan and Letitia Como, and on the other side Nelson Como Jr., Emma, and children Nathan, Cora and Bessie.

    - There is a second entry for Nelson Como in the 1880 census, showing a different age: Nelson Como, 60, works as a servant at a hotel at 158 State Street. The implication is that Nelson lives at this address and perhaps he does, with his family on Albany Avenue.

    - Ogdensburg city directory, 1883-4, Como Nelson, laborer, h. 95 Albany aveue

    - Death record: Nelson Como, aged 75 years died 7 March 1887. He was a laborer and was born in Canada. His father was John Como, his mother was Margaret. He died of pneumonia and old age. C.C. Benton was the attending physician.

    - Ogdensburg Cemetery index of burials: Item #2477 is for Nelson Como, buried 9 March 1887. He died at the age of 75.

    - Letter from Judy Fritz, 14 JUL 1987: Judy Fritz wrote that her grandmother (Elizabeth Como Proctor) told her a story about her grandparents. Her grandmother, whom she thinks was originally a LaPoint married Nelson Como. The LaPoint family was from Boston and considered Nelson to be quite beneath her, and disinherited her. She said the young bride (Marinda Holmes) developed arthritis very early in life and was cared for very lovingly by her husband Nelson for several years before she died. Her gradmother also said the the Como family was related to the aide-de-camp to Napolean and to Ethan Allen of the Green Mountain Boys.
    The second wife of Nelson Como Jr. and not senior, was named Armeline Bertrand, born in Canada in 1841. Her mother, Margaret Cavalier Bartrand, was previously married to Paul LaPointe, with whom she had five children. She married Theophile Bartrand after Paul LaPointe died. Nelson Sr.'s first wife was Marinda Holmes and he very likely cared for her before her death, after which he married Marinda Turrill. While the family is related to Napoleon's captain of artillery, Baron Sebastien Joseph Francois Comeau; there is no relationship to Ethan Allen.

    - Why did Nelson leave his family in Quebec to come to Watertown, NY and then Ogdensburg? According to "French Canadian Emigration to the United States, 1840-1930" by Claude Belanger, "the fundamental underlying causes of French-Canadian emigration can be found in the unequal levels of industrial development and standards of living between Quebec and New England. The industrial gap, combined with structural problems which plagued Quebec’s agriculture during the 19th and the first half of the 20th century, created an economic climate where thousands of French Canadians were pushed to emigrate in order to earn a living. By the 1830s and 1840s, Quebec’s most fertile farm land had been systematically occupied, leaving mostly peripheral regions open to agricultural colonisation, and thousands of landless farmers searching either for affordable, accessible and fertile land, or gainful employment. Between 1784 and 1844, Quebec’s population increased by about 400 percent while its total area of agricultural acreage rose only by 275 percent, creating an important deficit of available farmland."

    Nelson married Marinda Tyrrell on 17 Oct 1854 in Ogdensburg, NY. Marinda (daughter of William Tyrrell and Sarah Turner) was born in Nov 1834 in Cornwall, Ontario; died on 3 May 1910 in Ogdensburg, NY. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  2. 9.  Marinda Tyrrell was born in Nov 1834 in Cornwall, Ontario (daughter of William Tyrrell and Sarah Turner); died on 3 May 1910 in Ogdensburg, NY.

    Notes:

    - 1851: Matilda Tyrrel, 16 (1836) is a servant in home of Andrew, 34 and Sarah Dunbar, 30, at Cornwall, Ontario. She was b. Upper Canada, Church of England. Dunbar was b. Ireland, 1818.

    - 1860 U.S. census, Ogdensburg First Ward: Marinda is 25 and born Canada. She is living with husband Nelson Commo and three sons, William (5), John (3) and George (6 months). Marinda is listed as not being able to read or write.

    - 1870 U.S. census, Ogdensburg: Marinda is 38 and living with husband Nelson Como. She was born in Canada. Her children in the house are William (14), John (12), George (10) and Lavina (1).

    - 1880 U.S. census, Ogdensburg, Marinda is 44 and living with husband Nelson (68). Children in the house are William (24), John (20), George (20), lavina (11) and Mary (7). Marinda is listed as having been born in Canada with her parents born in England.

    - 1900 U.S. census, Ogdensburg: Marinda is 65 and is living with son John Como and his family at 83 King St. She was born in November of 1834 and was married when she was 19. She has had seven children and five are still alive. She was born in Canada and her parents were born in England. She is working as a housekeeper. Years in US: 46; can read, write and speak English; did not attend school. Living next door at 85 King is John and Delia Thayer.

    - 1910 U.S census, Ogdensburg: Rena Como is 76 years and widowed. She is living with her son-in-law Henry F. Nevin and daughter Vina and their children. She was born in England as were both of her parents.

    - Death record: Marinda Turell Como died 3 May 1910. Father was William Turell, born Canada, mother is unknown. Her age was 75 years, 5 months, 4 days. Her occupation was retired. She was born in Canada Nov. 9, 1834. Residence was 64 N.Y. Avenue in Ogdensburg. Cause of death was Bright's Disease. Dr. Stillwell was attending physician. She was buried in the Ogdensburg Cemetery.

    - Daily News: Mrs. Miranda Como died last night at the home of her son-in-law, Henry Nevin, 64 New York Ave., at the age of 75 years. The funeral of Mrs. Malinda Como will be held from the home of Henry Nevin 64 New York Ave., Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. A. M. officiating.

    - Nelson Como and Miss Marinda Tyrel were married at the Methodist Parsonage on Caroline St., Ogdensburg, NY, Oct. 12, 1854 by Rev. T. Newman.

    - The 1900 census shows Marinda emigrated into the U.S. in 1854, the same year she married Nelson Como.

    Children:
    1. William Como was born in Oct 1855 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 9 Jul 1939 in Tampa, FL; was buried in Tampa, FL.
    2. 4. John W. Como was born in Dec 1857 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 4 Jun 1929 in Yorkville, NY; was buried in Jun 1930 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    3. George Como was born on 11 Jan 1859 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 16 Jan 1938 in Canton, NY.
    4. Maria Como was born in 1862 in Ogdensburg, NY; was christened in in Notre Dame Church, Ogdensburg, NY; died before 1870 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    5. Marie Malvina Como was born on 26 Jan 1870 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 11 May 1952 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    6. Minnie May Como was born on 22 Aug 1876 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 21 Dec 1966 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg, NY.

  3. 10.  William Robert Thayer was born in 1841 in Quebec (son of John J. Thayer and Nancy Delilah Brown); died on 3 Jun 1902 in Bay City, MI.

    Notes:

    Note: For a timeline on events involving Robert and his family St. Lawrence County, see John Thayer Sr.

    - Robert's son John was born in Ontario and shows W.R., (William Robert) as his father's name: Stormont, Ontario, Canada, Nov. 19, 1871, John Junior Thayer, born of W.R. Thayer, and Harriet Rehor; father is shoemaker; Division: Iroquois; County: Stormont. Robert's full name also was revealed by the birth of a son, William Robert Thayer, Jr., in his second marriage.

    -1850 census shows Robert, 8, living in Gouverneur with parents John Thayer and Nancy.

    -1860 census shows Robert Thayer, b. abt. 1840-Canada, residing in DeKalb, St. Lawrence County, with the Oliver Lennox family. Oliver Lennox is married to Robert's older sister Julia A. Thayer.

    - 1861: John Thayer and three of his sons (John Jr., Robert and Alfred) all enlisted in the 16th New York Infantry in 1861. Potsdam: Oct. 16, 1861: "Capt. George Parker passed through this village last evening en route for the headquarters of his regiment with the following named recruits, whom he had enlisted at and near Gouverneur: John Thayer, Jr. and Alfred Thayer. The father and another son of the above Thayers (Robert) are already in Capt. Parker's company." All served in Company D of the 16th New York Infantry. John Thayer Sr. was first to enlist on May 1, 1861 at age 44; Robert enlisted the next day on May 2, 1861 at age 21; Alfred enlisted Sept. 19, 1861 at age 19; and John Jr. on Sept. 27, 1861 at age 27. Robert was discharged later that year on Dec. 10, 1861 due to a concussion from falling from a railroad car; John Sr. and John Jr. were discharged together "for disability" on Feb. 20, 1862 at Alexandria Va.; and Alfred went through the war, was wounded at Gaines Mills, VA June 17, 1862 and discharged for disability, but re-enlisted and was discharged as a full sergeant July 31, 1865, at Manchester, VA. All of them participated in the battles at Pohock Church, Va. on Sept. 21 and again on Oct. 4. About a week later, Robert fell from a railroad car and suffered a brain concussion. He did not participate in any further battles and was discharged Dec. 10. John Sr. and John Jr. were discharged the following February without engaging in any further battles. Alfred went on to participate in battles at West Point, Va. in May 7, 1862, Mechanicsville, Va. May 22; Chickahominy, Va. June 1, and Gaines Mill, Va. June 27 when he was wounded. He was at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Va. Dec. 11-15, 1863; Franklin's Crossing, Va. April 29-May 2, and Marye's Heights and Salem Church, Va. May 3-4, 1863; and discharged in July, 1865.

    - National Archives, Civil War Records, Robert Thayer, Co.D 16 NY Inf., Private. Enrolled at Gouverneur, NY 2 May 1861 for 2 years; discharged at Camp Franklin, VA 10 Dec 1861 , Surgeon's Certificate Disability; b. Canada, 21 years, 5' 9", dark complexion, gray eyes, brown hair, occupation laborer; concussion of the brain caused by fall from the cars while in motion, unfit for duty last 60 days - 8 Jan1862; returning to Gouverneur, NY.

    - Between 1863 and 1866, John Thayer Jr. died, and Robert either married his widow Harriet or simply moved in and took up supporting her and her two or three children by John. We know that Caroline E. and Alfred were definitely John's children, and Mary, b. 1868, may have been as well.

    - In late 1868 or early 1869, Robert joined his parents in relocating to Michigan. The 1870 census shows Robert at East Saginaw, Mich, Ward 1: Robert Thayer, 30, barber, born Canada (abt. 1840) Harriet, 30, b. NY in 1840, with children Caroline, 12; Alford, 7; and Mary, 2, all born NY; and Delia, 10 months, born in Michigan. Also residing with them is Robert's brother Sylvester, (actually 15) showing an age of 18, and also a barber.
    Curious is that while Robert and Harriet are established in Saginaw Michigan in 1870, their son John G., was born in Stormont County, Ontario, Canada on Nov. 19, 1871.

    - In 1870, Robert and his wife Harriet and their first four children - Caroline, Alfred, Mary and Deila - are living in Saginaw.

    -1880 census: Robert, 39, a barber, married to Harriett, 40, b. abt. 1841 in Canada, residing June 10, 1880, in Toledo, Ohio with children Alfred, 17, an apprentice barber; Mary, 12; Deila, 11; John, 9; and Charles, 5. The 1880 Toledo city directory shows Robert as a barber for A. D'Angelo, and residing on Superior St.

    - 1881 Toledo directory: no Robert Thayer.
    - 1882: Robert lives Bay City, Mich with 13-year-old.
    - 1882 Ogd. city directory. No Thayers.
    - 1883 Bay City: No Thayers
    - 1883 Saginaw, MI: Sylvester, barber, resides 716 LaPeer.

    - 1900 U.S. Census at Bay City, Mich., Ward 5, are: Robert Thayer, 59, shoemaker, b. Nov., 1840, and Cecila Thayer, 31, b. July, 1868, married for 18 years, married in 1882.

    - On Nov. 19, 1890, a Civil War pension application was filed in Michigan for Robert Thayer, Co. D, 16thNY, as an invalid.

    - A document, "Special Schedule-Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines and Widows, etc." filed in June, 1890 in the Ogdensburg Civil Division, shows: "Harriet, widow of John Thayer, private, 16NY Inf., enlisted 1861." Both John and Harriet's husband Robert enlisted in this division, and it appears that Harriet may have been improperly collecting a pension from her brother-in-law, John Thayer. The document states that in June, 1890, Harriet was residing in Ogdensburg.

    - LDS Michigan Marriages, 1868-1925: Robert Thayer, b. 1841, Canada, son of John Thayer and Nancy Thiers, married Cecelia Deacon, April 19, 1899, at Bay City, Bay, Michigan. Robert was 58. The bride's age is 30. She was born in 1869 in Canada. The bride's father is George Deacon. Her mother is Elizabeth Coulsor.

    - Summary: In 1870, Robert and his wife Harriet and their first four children - Caroline, Alfred, Mary and Deila - are living in Saginaw, Michigan. While Harriet was pregnant with John, who was born in November, 1871, Robert was having an affair with a young woman named Ellen Doyle and in July, 1871, when his wife was five months pregnant, Robert impregnated Ellen, who gave birth to a daughter she named Ellen Garfield Thayer, the following April, 1872. It would appear that Harriet didn't know about this situation since, three years later, she and Robert are still in Michigan together, and had another child, Charles, who was born in September, 1875 in Michigan.
    After that point, it is possible Harriet discovered Robert's illegitimate child, and/or he was being hounded by the child's mother - or her parents - for support, because about 1876, Robert took his family out of state, moving to Toledo Ohio, where they are found in the 1880 census.
    By 1881, Harriet and Robert's daughter Catherine had married and was living with her husband in Toledo. About this time, Robert moved back to Saginaw where his brother Sylvester and his parents were living and a year later in 1882, Robert, now 42 years old, takes up residence in Bay City, Michigan, a suburb of Saginaw, with a 13-year-old girl (not Ellen Doyle) and impregnates her in October of that year. The next July (1883) the girl, Cecila Deacon, now just 14, gives birth to Margaret Thayer.
    Somewhere in this period, Harriet moved back to Ogdensburg, NY with her children, probably between 1882 (no Thayers in the Ogdensburg city directory that year) and 1885, since in June of 1886, her daughter Delia married at age 17 in Ogdensburg and so must have been living with Harriet prior to the marriage. The 1890 Ogdensburg directory shows Harriet as a laundrywoman boarding at 85 King St. - she is still there 10 years later in the same occupation in the 1900 city directory. She died May 7, 1900.
    Cecila and Robert had three more children - William Robert Thayer, Jr. in 1886, Clara M. in 1890, and Cecila M. in 1892 - before he married Cecila April 19, 1899 at Bay City. The marriage record shows Robert as 58 and Cecila as 30.
    The next year in the 1900 census, Robert and wife Cecila are at Bay City with not only their children, but Robert's illegitimate daughter by Ellen Doyle, Ellen Garfield Thayer, now 28 and only two years younger than Robert's new wife. Interestingly, Robert and Cecila, in this census, claim they have been married 18 years. Actually, they've been living together for 18 years, but have been married for only one.
    Robert died in 1902 and by 1905, wife Cecila was remarried to William Martindale and living in the same house - the 1910 census shows they have been married for five years. Living with them is Robert Thayer Jr. It is doubtful that Robert and Harriet divorced; there didn't seem time, and I cannot find any divorce record. So he likely committed bigamy when he remarried to Cecila.

    William married Harriet Rehor about 1865 in St Lawrence County, NY. Harriet (daughter of Jean Baptiste Remillard and Marie Josephte Dupere) was born on 1 Apr 1839 in Ogdensburg, NY; died on 3 May 1900 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg Cemetery, NY. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  4. 11.  Harriet Rehor was born on 1 Apr 1839 in Ogdensburg, NY (daughter of Jean Baptiste Remillard and Marie Josephte Dupere); died on 3 May 1900 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg Cemetery, NY.

    Notes:

    - 1850 census: Harriet, 12, resides in Gouverneur with her parents and family.

    - 1860 Census: Harriet, 20, and daughter Caroline E. Thayer, 2, reside with John Thayer, 26, his wife Caroline, 24, and their daughter Roda Ann at Fowler, NY, St. Lawrence County, close to where Robert Thayer is working on the Oliver Lennox farm in Dekalb. Oliver is married to Robert's older sister, Julia.

    - Harriet Thayer's death record from the Ogdensburg City Clerk states that her father was John Rehor and that her mother was Mary, both were born in Canada.

    - According to Jennifer Gonnuscio, descended from Robert/Harriet's daughter Caroline, Harriet was residing in Toledo in 1896 when she witnessed her daughter's widow's pension. However, we know she was in Ogdensburg in 1890 and in 1900, because she is listed in both those city directories as boarding at 85 King St. and working as a laundrywoman. It is likely she returned to Ogdensburg prior to 1886, when her daughter Delia married at age 17 in June of that year.

    - Ogdensburg Daily Journal: May 5, 1900: The funeral of Mrs. Harriet Thayer took place this morning from the Congregational Church, Rev. A. M. Weight officiating. The remains were sent to Gouverneur, the former home of the deceased, for interment.

    - A document, "Special Schedule-Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines and Widows, etc." filed in June, 1890 in the Ogdensburg Civil Division, shows: "Harriet, widow of John Thayer, private, 16NY Inf., enlisted 1861."

    - Daily Journal: May 9, 1900: Gouverneur, May 7: Mrs. Harriet Thayer, mother of A. F. Thayer of this place, died at the home of her son, John Thayer, at Ogdensburg, Thursday (May 3.) Mrs. Thayer resided in this place for many years. Her maiden name was Rehor, and she was born at Ogdensburg 63 years ago (1837.) Internment will be in Riverside Cemetery here tomorrow afternoon. Three sons, A. F. of Gouverneur, John and Charles Thayer of Ogdensburg, and a daughter, Mrs. Carrie Rooney, of Toledo, Ohio, survive.

    Children:
    1. Mary Thayer was born in 1868 in NY; died on 17 Dec 1896 in Toledo, OH.
    2. 5. Delila Thayer was born in Aug 1869 in East Saginaw, MI; died on 9 Nov 1899 in Ogdensburg, NY; was buried in Ogdensburg, NY.
    3. John G. Thayer was born on 19 Nov 1871 in Stormont, Ontario; died on 28 Mar 1911 in Toledo, OH; was buried on 3 Apr 1911 in Calvary Cemetery, Toledo, OH.
    4. Charles Valentine Thayer was born on 27 Sep 1875 in MI; was christened on 17 Aug 1902 in St Mary's Cathedral, Ogdensburg, NY; died on 28 Oct 1916 in Huron, OH.

  5. 12.  Maxime Ricard was born about 1817 in Saint Constant, Quebec (son of Jean Baptiste Ricard and Marguerite Chaloux); died on 3 Aug 1906 in Huntingdon, Quebec.

    Notes:

    - Napierreville, Saint-Remi-de-la-Salle, Oct. 8,1838, marry Maxime Ricard, minor son of Jean Baptiste Ricard and Marie Marguerite Chaloux, of the parish of St. Edward, and, Salome Guillotte, minor daqughter of Etienne Guillotte and Rose Duquet of this parish.

    - 1861 census of Canada at Napierville, are: Maxime Ricard, farmer, 37; Celena, 36; Narcisse, 15; Ela, 14; Noe, 10; Elezime, 18; Mary, 7 and Francois, 3.

    - 1871 census of Canada at Huntingdon East, Hemmingford, Maxime Recor 53 (b. 1818,) Selena Recor 57, Noule Recor 19, Francois Recor 12, Eliza Recor 8, and Margaret Recor 6.

    - 1881 census of Canada at Napierville, are Maxime Ricard, 52; and wife Solema, 51, with daughter Marguerite, 15. Living with them is his son, Narcisse, 32; his wife Suzanne, 25; and their children Joseph, 10; Philomon, 8; Narcisse, 7; Moise, 5; Peter, 3; and Anna, 4 mos.

    - 1891 Census of Canada: Maxime Ricard is residing in Huntingdon Village, Hundington, Quebec, identified as Michael Recor, 75, with wife Salome, 72. Living with them is their daughter Margaret, 23, with husband Joseph Sorel, 24, and their children Joseph Sorel, 3, and Dominick, 4 mos.

    - St-Joseph, Huntingdon, Quebec, Aug. 6, 1906, bury Maxime Ricard, died Aug. 3, husband of Salomie Guyot, age 86.

    Maxime married Marie Salome Guillot on 9 Oct 1838 in Saint Remi, Napierville, Quebec. Marie (daughter of Etienne Guillot and Marie Rosalie Duguet) was born on 6 Dec 1822 in Saint Constant, Quebec; died on 8 Jan 1907 in Huntingdon, Quebec. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  6. 13.  Marie Salome Guillot was born on 6 Dec 1822 in Saint Constant, Quebec (daughter of Etienne Guillot and Marie Rosalie Duguet); died on 8 Jan 1907 in Huntingdon, Quebec.

    Notes:

    - St-Joseph, 1907, Jan. 9, bury Salomie Guyot, died Jan., 8 at age 92, wife of Maxime Ricard. Present for services were Noe Ricard, Toussaint Lefebvre, Francis Allard, Alphonse Tessier, Joseph Labarge, John Millyoure, James Blanchard.

    Children:
    1. Marie Salomee Ricard was born on 10 Jun 1840 in Napierville, Quebec; died on 1 Dec 1920 in Huntingdon, Quebec.
    2. Onesime Ricard was born on 22 Apr 1844 in Saint Remi, Napierville, Quebec; died about 1915 in Huntingdon, Quebec.
    3. Narcisse Ricard was born in Apr 1846 in Napierville, Quebec; died on 4 Feb 1928 in Malone, NY.
    4. Noah Ricard was born in 1851 in Saint Remi, Napierville, Quebec; died in 1930 in Montreal, Quebec.
    5. 6. Francois Recore was born on 20 Nov 1858 in Saint Michel, Napierville, Quebec; died on 26 May 1934 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    6. Marguerite Ricard was born on 26 Mar 1867 in Saint Patrice de Sherrington, Quebec; died on 9 May 1905 in Huntingdon, Quebec.
    7. Elie Ricard was born on 10 Mar 1848 in Saint Edouard, Napierville, Quebec; died on 3 Mar 1936 in Huntingdon, Quebec.
    8. Marie Elizabeth Ricard was born on 21 Apr 1863 in Chateauguay, Quebec; died on 8 Sep 1879 in Huntingdon, Quebec.
    9. Marie Ricard was born on 24 Mar 1854 in Saint Michel, Napierville, Quebec; died on 19 Jan 1930 in Burke, NY.

  7. 14.  Hyancinthe Joseph Dumas was born on 7 Sep 1795 in Chambly, Quebec (son of Pierre Ignace Dumas and Marie Magdeleine Poupart); died on 5 Sep 1903 in Huntingdon, Quebec.

    Notes:

    - Joseph Ricard and Rose Fauber were living in Ormstown, Quebec, Parish of St. Malachie d'Ormstown, when they married in 1842. Ormstown is located about midway between Huntingdon to the west, and Saint Chrysostome to the east, about 20 miles apart, and about 9 miles to the New York State line. They lived there and had their children there until about 1867 when they moved south about 14 miles to Burke, NY, near Malone. Daughter Julienne was born in Quebec in 1865 and the family shows up at Burke in 1870.

    - Sept. 7, 1795, Chambly (St-Joseph) baptize Joseph, of the marriage of Pierre Ignace Dumas and Magdelaine Poupart. The godfather is Joseph Dumas. Note: Some sites claim Joseph was orn Sept. 4, 1807, in Contrecoeur but offer no proof. Joseph was baptized as per above when his father was 50 and mother 36. His six siblings were born from 1779 to 1788 and Joseph, the last child, was born seven years later in 1795 and not 19 years later.

    - St Chrysotome: 1842, Nov. 14, marry Joseph Dumas of Ormstown, major son of the late Pierre Dumas and Magdelaine Poupart, and Rose Fauber of Ormstown, major daughter of Pierre Fauber and Marguerite Laberge. When they were married, Joseph was 47 and Rose, 19. I have found no records indicating a previous marriage.

    - 1861 Canadian census: At Huntingdon, Quebec, is Joseph Dumas with his wife's name as Susan, rather than Rosalee. There is no question this is Joseph and Rosalee because they were in 1861; because of the unusually large age difference between husband and wife, and that most of the children match in name and age though first names are different for several, in part due to nicknames. Following is the census as listed and what we know of the family in parenthesis: Joseph Dumas, 56 (66;) Susan Dumas, 34 (Rosalee, 39;) and children Joseph 19, (18;) what looks like Moses, 17, (Moyse, 17;) Rosa, 15 (Rosalie, 14;) Susan, 12 (Francoise, 13 - we know that Francoise was baptized with that name yet was called Susan throughout her life;) Alexander, 10 (Delaide, 11;) and Henry, 8. The census notes the deaths of Delaide and Henry the previous year. We also know the couple had a daughter Marie who would be 14 in 1861 but she is not shown in the census.

    - It would appear that Joseph moved his family from Huntingdon, Quebec, directly south about 14 miles to Burke, NY, near Malone, about 1865, since we know daughter Julienne was born in July of 1864 at Ormstown.

    - 1870 U.S. census: Joseph and Rosalee Dumas first show up in New York at Burke, in the U.S. census of 1870: Joseph age 60, his wife Rosey, 30; Moyse (Moses,) 22; his wife Mary, 16, and daughter Margaret, 7 mos. Also are other children of Joseph and Rosalee, including Mary 15; Margaret, 9; Julia, 8; and Ann, 7. All were born in Canada.

    - Feb. 13, 1878: Notice in the Malone Palladium of default by Joseph Dumas on property in the Town of Burke, Franklin County, of a mortgage executed by Joseph Dumas Oct. 4, 1876, to Elvira Hare of Burke, and that the property will be sold at public auction. The amount owed is $232: all that tract of land situate in the Town of Burke, being part of a grant, No. 7, old military trace, commencing in the highway in the north and south road, past the dwelling house of John Flyn, containing four acres.

    - 1900 U.S. census: Residing at Malone, NY with daughter Rose and family, Joseph is listed at 100 years old, when he actually is 104.

    - 1901 Canadian census: Residing at Huntingdon, Quebec, with his daughter Julie and her family, Joseph is listed as being 101 years old, born in 1800. In fact, Joseph was 105, having been born in September of 1795 with the census being taken April 2-3, 1901.

    - Malone Palladium, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1903: Joseph Dumas, formerly a resident of this town but who had lived in Huntingdon, Quebec for the past two years, died in that village on Saturday (Sept. 5, 1903) at the ripe old age of 106 years. Mr. Dumas was the father-in-law of Peter Brayton of Malone, with whom he had made his home for a number of years. Without doubt, Mr. Dumas was the oldest resident in this section of the country. (Actually, Joseph Dumas died two days short of his 108th birthday.)

    - From Doug Barton's web site: http://d21c.com/OU812/emaillinks.html: is a picture of Joseph Dumas: "The original now belongs to my son, Matt. On the back it says: "Joseph Dumas of Huntingdon, Quebec, who lived to be 106 years old. Picture acquired (by Leonard Dumas) from Buddy Flynn in 1971." Now it looks like Mose Dumas gave it to his daughter, Laura Dumas Crippen, who in turn gave it to her daughter, Carolyne "Buddy" Flynn, who is Anne Phillips' mother. I don't believe there is a way to absolutely authenticate this photo. I'm willing to accept it on faith, and label it "believed to be Joseph Dumas, father of Mose Dumas."

    - St Patrick's in Chateaugay NY has marraige of Maria Dumas, daughter of Joseph and Rosalia Fontaine Dumas, on Sept 11, 1870 to Elie Ricard; witnesses listed Maria Ricard and Rosa Fontaine. This Rosalia Fontaine may be Joseph's second wife, Rose Mason.

    Hyancinthe married Rosalee Faubert on 14 Nov 1842 in Saint Chrysostome, Chateauguay, Quebec. Rosalee (daughter of Pierre Faubert and Marguerite Laberge) was born on 3 Sep 1823 in Beauharnois, Quebec; died on 7 Feb 1875 in Huntingdon, Quebec. [Group Sheet] [Family Chart]


  8. 15.  Rosalee Faubert was born on 3 Sep 1823 in Beauharnois, Quebec (daughter of Pierre Faubert and Marguerite Laberge); died on 7 Feb 1875 in Huntingdon, Quebec.

    Notes:

    - Sept. 14, 1823, Sainte-Martine, Quebec, baptise Rosalee, born Sept. 3, to Pierre Faubert, and Marguerite Laberge.

    - Nov. 14, 1842, St-Chrysotome, marry Joseph Dumas, of Malachie D'Ormstown, major son of the late Pierre Dumas and Magdeleine Fortier, and Rose Fauber, major daughter of Pierre Fauber and Marguerite Laberge. Present were her brother Berthelime.

    - Huntingdon, Quebec: Feb. 9, 1875, bury Rosalie Faubert, wife of Joseph Dumas, of Burke, NY, died Feb. 7 at age 52.

    Children:
    1. Rosalee Dumas was born in 1846 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 22 Oct 1927 in Malone, NY.
    2. 7. Marguerite Dumas was born on 15 Nov 1859 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 8 Aug 1936 in Lisbon, NY; was buried on 11 Aug 1936 in Ogdensburg, NY.
    3. Moyse Dumas was born on 8 Aug 1844 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 13 Sep 1925 in Burke, NY.
    4. Francoise Susan Dumas was born on 15 Aug 1848 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 16 May 1931 in Malone, NY.
    5. Joseph Dumas was born on 6 May 1843 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 8 Nov 1917 in Chateaugay, NY.
    6. Delaide Dumas was born on 30 Sep 1850 in Ormstown, Quebec; died in Sep 1860 in Ormstown, Quebec.
    7. Julienne Dumas was born on 27 Jul 1864 in Ormstown, Quebec; died on 16 May 1931 in Malone, NY.
    8. Marie Dumas was born in 1845 in Ormstown, Quebec; died before 1936 in Huntingdon, Quebec.
    9. Henry Dumas was born in 1853 in Ormstown, Quebec; died in 1860 in Ormstown, Quebec.
    10. Anne Dumas was born on 19 Dec 1860 in Franklin County, NY; died in 1929 in Montreal, Quebec.